Add neutral colors to your designs

Written by admin

i

09 April 2021, Friday

Add neutral colors to your designs

Neutral colors can add so much to the visual look of your e-learning. Neutrals make good background colors and are excellent choices for text and other elements that anchor the slide. What I mean isn’t everything must grab your attention directly. A neutral color is one can be subtle and perform a variety of functions without overpowering the other content. First and foremost, respect the brand. Here’s a sample brand palette with both primary and secondary colors. The primary colors not only work well together, but they also make excellent neutrals. This simply means these colors don’t distract the learner like a lime green a bright fuchsia might. Get acquainted with your color palette. Choose colors that go well together. Here I’m working with the first palette I showed earlier. Dark blue and light gold are perfect colors on which to build a branded course. I make sure I have a light and dark color that go well together and can be used together as I’ve done here with this text. There will be situations where you will need light and dark text, so make sure you have chosen good options to use throughout the course. Next, I experiment with doing different colors together and seeing how they fit with my two primaries. These colors all work well together, so any combination here would work really. Adding transparency to a shape also opens up a lot of possibilities. Have you ever tried this? I could use any of these colors as a transparent background. Keep your content high contrast therefore the screen reader can read it. Text that’s too low contrast can’t be interpreted and, therefore, could also be missed. Always use high contrast just like the column on the proper. That ensures your text is readable and can be seen by all. Here’s an example of high contrast. Notice that the dark grey at the bottom has a lighter text on it and that the lighter areas have darker text on them. Again, keeping it high contrast so that everything is readable and accessible for everybody. To help screen readers be ready to decipher what’s on-screen, we add something called ALT tags. ALT tags are simply short phrases, or maybe even one word, that describes the content. Let me show you how that works. Here I’m in PowerPoint and I am preparing a bear safety eLearning course. I want to feature an ALT tag to the graphic so that the screen reading software will know it is a graphic of a bear. I’m getting to start by double-clicking on the bear to mention my format picture options. I’m going to choose that third option over from the left where I can choose size and position and so forth. I’m getting to scroll right down to where it says ALT text. Here I have the option of adding a title and I’m going to just simply put in black bear. I might want to add a description here. Maybe I’ll say American black bear graphic. Simply adding an ALT text will help the screen reading software to inform the user what they’re alleged to be viewing. Even though I’m demonstrating this in PowerPoint most eLearning programs like Storyline or Adobe Captivate do have ALT tag capabilities and anything online, websites, eLearning courses, all have ALT tags for images. Just any text won’t do for accessibility. It must be readable. This example shows a font that’s too light for online viewing. Here only one weight heavier and what a difference. This example shows the perils of bad letter spacing. You can see how tight the letters are and it’s not readable. Too tight and therefore the letters touch and it can’t be deciphered by the screen reading software. Or too loose letter spacing confuses also. Important information put into a graphic can be missed by a disabled learner. The screen reading software cannot read it if it’s embedded during a graphic. It’s always a good idea to include a separate text link to give access to all. You may notice that on websites, sometimes when they have graphics that are linked, they also have text links at the bottom for that same reason. Again to make the content accessible to all. Avoid using the word click. This describes sound blind or motion-impaired persons are not able to access. We use the words tap or press, or something similar, instead. Any video, audio, or other multi-media with sound, will need captioning. Always a good idea to offer to caption. Captioning is necessary for both video and audio content. In some cases, you would possibly get to offer it in multi-languages also. To learn more about web page accessibility guidelines, visit the planet Wide Web Consortium. They create all the rules for the internet. Here I’m showing an example of the online page. You can scroll down and you’ll view all of the various rules. You can inspect their blog for articles on accessibility and more. Use these simple tips to make sure your content is accessible. Accessibility is always a good idea to make your content available, and readable, to everyone.

Related Topics..

Simplify your designs

Simplify your designs

Simplify your designs You can apply this rule to several things in life, less is more. This is especially crucial with...

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!